Credit Repair in Greensboro

Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 11 vs. Chapter 13

Before you decide on credit repair in Greensboro you may first need to decide if you should file for bankruptcy in CR  or not ?  Chapter 7 is the fastest. In many cases, this type of bankruptcy case can be completed in a few months. Chapter 13 cases, on the other hand, cannot exceed five years but usually last about that long. There is no time limit on Chapter 11 plans.  It is an essential strategy to repair credit.

Both Chapter 13 and Chapter 11 may allow you to keep certain assets you may lose under Chapter 7. For example, if you own a recreational boat without debt, you may have to surrender that in a straight bankruptcy, but you may be able to keep it if you pay the trustee the value of the boat in your Chapter 13 plan.

Both Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 may offer more help with Greensboro and mortgages. In Chapter 7, if you are behind on these payments and can’t catch up, you may wind up losing that property. Under Chapter 13, you may be able to catch up on those past due amounts over time. In some situations, homeowners can wipe out a second mortgage on an underwater home or negotiate a modification of their primary mortgage by filing for this type of bankruptcy. Chapter 11 may be especially helpful to small business owners or real estate investors with multiple properties by allowing them to restructure their debts or catch up on payments that are behind.  Credit counseling can help with this.

Chapter 7 is generally cheaper than Chapters 13 or 11. With the former, you must pay your attorney upfront. With the latter, you may be able to pay part of your fee over time as part of your plan. Chapter 11 is generally the most expensive due to the higher filing fees and cost of the legal work involved.

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In Greensboro use a trusted credit repair company

early bankruptcy removal The automatic stay stops most collection efforts during your bankruptcy. But the stay is not absolute – creditors can ask the bankruptcy court to remove the stay, called lifting the automatic stay. If successful, the creditor can continue its collection efforts against you.


Read on to learn how creditors can lift the stay, when they might ask the court to lift the stay, and more.


What Is the Automatic Stay?


The automatic stay prohibits creditors from collecting from you while your bankruptcy case is proceeding. It takes effect immediately upon filing the bankruptcy case (that’s why it’s called automatic), and it stops (stays) collection action on pre-bankruptcy debts. The intent is to give you a breathing spell from creditor harassment while you develop a plan to reorganize your finances.


The automatic stay is both broad and powerful. Since it only has a few narrow exceptions, creditors must tread very carefully during a bankruptcy case or risk violating the court’s injunction.


(To learn more about the automatic stay, see the articles in our Bankruptcy’s Automatic Stay area.)


Asking the Court to Remove the Stay: Motions to Lift the Stay


If a creditor wants to continue to collect from the debtor during the bankruptcy, it can seek permission directly from the court to do so, known as “lifting” or getting “relief from” the automatic stay. The creditor must do this by filing a “motion” with the court.


Motions to lift the stay are not as common as one would think. When a creditor files a motion to lift the automatic stay, the debtor is entitled to notice and a hearing. The burden is on the creditor to convince the bankruptcy court that there is a very good reason to lift the stay, and the court is predisposed to continue the bankruptcy protection. For instance, the court will not lift the stay when an unsecured debt will be included in the debtor’s discharge.


When a Court Might Lift the Automatic Stay

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Greensboro

Four ways bankrupcy could help you

early bankruptcy removal How can I tell a credit repair scam from a reputable credit counselor?


Answer: There are counselors who can help you with your credit report, and others who take your money but don’t help you. Warning signs for credit repair scams include companies that ask you to pay before providing services. The company may claim that it can guarantee a specific increase in your credit score or get rid of negative credit information in your credit report, even though the information is accurate and current.


Recognizing a credit repair scam


Warning signs for credit repair scams include companies that ask you to pay before providing services. The company may tell you it can guarantee a specific increase in your credit score or get rid of negative credit information in your credit report, even though the information is accurate and current.


If you see ads or receive offers to repair or fix your credit, it could be a warning sign if the company:


Pressures you to pay up-front fees. The company wants you to pay before it provides any services. A simple rule to follow is “Don’t pay upfront.” If the company uses telemarketing such that the federal Telemarketing Sales Rule applies, the credit repair company may not request or receive fees until it gives you a credit report generated more than six months after the promised results that shows the results. Under the federal Credit Repair Organizations Act, credit repair companies can’t request or receive payment until they’ve completed the services they’ve promised. Some companies will structure monthly payment plans to try to avoid this requirement. You should know that all forms of upfront payment before services are completed are illegal.


Promises to remove negative information from your credit report. The company tells you it can get rid of the negative credit information, even if that information is accurate and current. No one can do this.


Requests you dispute accurate information in your credit report. The company advises you to dispute all the information in your credit report, regardless of its accuracy or timeliness.


Refuses or avoids explaining your rights to you. The company doesn’t tell you your rights and what you can do for yourself for free. Disputing errors in your credit reports is a free legal right available to you under the Fair Credit Reporting Act; you don’t need to pay a credit repair organization to do it for you. Also, if you have just signed up for a credit repair service, you have the right to cancel your contract with any credit repair organization for any reason within three business days at no charge to you.


Tells you to not contact credit reporting companies. The company recommends that you don’t contact any of the nationwide credit reporting companies directly.


Credit repair companies are subject to numerous federal laws, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act and often the Telemarketing Sales Rule, both of which forbid credit repair organizations from using deceptive practices and from accepting up-front fees. These laws prohibit many deceptive practices by credit repair organizations. You may have a right to sue a credit repair organization using these laws.

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